HUDF

Fast Facts: Hubble Ultra Deep Field
Name Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF)
Description The HUDF is the deepest visible-light image of the universe ever observed by a telescope. The image shows about 10,000 galaxies, and is like a geologic core sample of the universe, cutting across billions of light-years of space. Hubble took 800 exposures in 400 orbits to build this image.
Age The most distant galaxies in the HUDF are seen as they were 13 billion years ago, when the universe was only 5 percent of its present age. These observations approach the time in the early universe when stars first began to shine.
Location The HUDF is found in the constellation Fornax, located in the Southern Hemisphere. This region of the sky is so empty that only a handful of the stars within our Milky Way Galaxy can be seen in the image.
Distance
from Earth
The distances of the galaxies in the HUDF vary. The nearest, larger, brighter, well-defined spiral and elliptical galaxies are about a billion light-years away. The farthest, smallest, reddest galaxies, numbering about 100, are 13 billion light-years away and may be among the most distant known.
Size The patch of sky is less than 2 percent of the area of the full Moon as seen from Earth. The HUDF measures only one-seventeenth of a degree across, an angular size smaller than that of the largest impact basin on the Moon.
Hubble Ultra Deep Field
About 10,000 galaxies, some as far as 13 billion light-years away, range over this tiny section of sky.

HUDF